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NERC E4 State-dependent cooperation among parents

  • Full or part time
    Dr P Smiseth
    Dr J Regan
  • Application Deadline
    Thursday, January 09, 2020
  • Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)
    Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)

Project Description

Interested individuals must follow the "how to apply" link on the Geosciences E4 Doctoral Training Partnership web page: http://www.ed.ac.uk/e4-dtp/how-to-apply

Summary
This project will study state-dependent cooperation among male and female parents in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides by investigating how each parent responds to variation in its own state and its partner’s state.

Project background
Biparental care occurs when males and females cooperate to provide care for their joint offspring, and has evolved repeatedly in birds, mammals, amphibians, fishes and insects. Biparental care is associated with sexual conflict over how much each parent should contribute. Most prior work on has focused on how each parent adjusts its contribution in response to changes in its partner’s contribution. In contrast, little is known about how each individual adjusts its contribution in response to its own state and that of its partner. For example, each parent might contribute less when its state deteriorates, but contribute more when its partner’s state deteriorates to compensate for any detrimental impact on its offspring. Furthermore, we might expect each parent to respond differently to different components of its own state depending on whether the state in question is reversible (e.g., nutritional state, infection and immune state) or permanent (e.g., inbreeding state, adult body size). The reason for this is that an individual might improve reversible states by reducing its own contribution whilst this would not be case for permanent states. Finally, each parent might respond differently to different components of its partner’s state depending on whether these states can be assessed directly or indirectly through changes in its partner’s behaviour. This project will examine how each parent responds to variation in different components of its own state and their partner’s state in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. In this species, males and females cooperate to care for their joint offspring and there is sexual conflict between over the amount of care that each parent should contribute, the amount of antimicrobials that each parent should deposit and how much food each parents should consume from the resource they share with the offspring.

Research questions
(1) How do parents respond to changes in their own state? Do parents respond differently and/or independently to changes in different state components? (2) How do parents respond to changes in their partner’s state? Do parents respond differently and/or independently to changes in different state components?

Methodology
The project will involve controlled experiments conducted under laboratory conditions and will development of methodology to manipulate different state components in focal individuals and record subsequent consequences for the behaviour and fitness of the focal individual and its partner. Year 1: Research training, planning of experiments, completion of first set of experiments. Year 2: Completion of second set of experiments, analyses and writing. Year 3: Completion of final set of experiments, analyses and writing.

Training
A comprehensive training programme will be provided comprising both specialist scientific training and generic transferable and professional skills.

Requirements
This project is suitable to a student with training in evolutionary or behavioural ecology, experimental design and statistical analyses.



Funding Notes

This project is eligible for the E4 Doctoral Training Partnership. The E4 projects are currently available for full NERC studentship funding which is competitive by interview AND AVAILABLE ONLY TO UK citizens and to EU citizens who have worked or studied in the UK for the previous 3 years.
For application details see View Website
Further details here - View Website

References

Cotter, S. C., & Kilner, R. M. (2010). Sexual division of antibacterial resource defence in breeding burying beetles, Nicrophorus vespilloides. Journal of Animal Ecology, 79, 35–43. Pilakouta, N., Richardson, J. & Smiseth, P.T. 2015. State-dependent cooperation in burying beetles: parents adjust their contribution towards care based on both their own and their partner’s size. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 28, 1965–1974. Pilakouta, N., Richardson, J. & Smiseth, P.T. 2016. If you eat, I eat: resolution of sexual conflict over consumption from a shared resource. Animal Behaviour 111, 175–180.

Related Subjects

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