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PhD Project in Physical Chemistry and Biophysical Engineering – development of biosensor based on mechanochormic polymers -


   Institute of Industrial Science

   Applications accepted all year round  Competition Funded PhD Project (Students Worldwide)

About the Project

In the laboratory of Biophysical Engineering, the Institute of Industrial Science, at the University of Tokyo, Japan, we have an open project for Master or PhD students.

Project description 

Polydiacetylene is a mechanochromic polymer that changes its color and emits fluorescence when an external force is being applied. It is a popular material in biosensing for the detection of antibodies, viruses, bacteria etc. However, its force-sensing mechanism has been mainly studied only qualitatively, making it difficult to use it as a quantitative sensor. The goal of the project is to unravel the “force-fluorescence relationship” of a mechanochromic polymer, polydiacetylene, at nanoscale by introducing nano-friction force microscopy recently demonstrated by the Group (Nano Lett 2021, 21 (1), 543-549). By answering the long-lasting open question in the field of mechanochemistry we will contribute to make the smallest force sensor that can be used to measure forces at molecular level in micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) and biosensors.

Please visit our webpage for the details!

 

Qualifications

Highly-motivated students with any background who are interested in pursuing a research career are encouraged to apply.

How to apply

If you are interested, please send your CV to . Selected candidates will be invited to an online Interview. Once the candidate passed the interview, he/she will be guided to go through the applications for the PhD program and scholarships at the University.


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