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  PhD Studentship in Tribology


   Department of Mechanical Engineering

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  Dr A Kadiric  Applications accepted all year round  Funded PhD Project (UK Students Only)

About the Project

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Tribology, leading to the award of a PhD degree. This is an industrially supported studentship for a period of 3.5 years, with all project costs and a bursary of ca. £25,000 per annum covered by one of our industrial partners.

Liquid lubricants are crucial components in almost all machines, where they prevent wear, seizure and other forms of surface damage and also, by reducing friction, make an essential contribution to improving energy efficiency and thus sustainability.

Lubricants generally operate in an air environment where their useful life is largely determined by the rate at which they oxidatively degrade.  Excessive degradation leads to an unacceptable increase in viscosity, deposit formation and corrosive wear. Lubricant degradation is critically dependent on temperature, so when lubricants are designed their susceptibility to oxidation is measured using high temperature bench oxidation tests. However, it has recently become evident that lubricants can degrade considerably faster in machines than they do at similar temperatures in bench tests. The reasons for this are not yet clear but may result from rupture of lubricant molecules in rubbing contacts (mechanochemistry) and/or catalytic metal wear debris. 

This project will compare lubricant degradation in bench tests (autooxidation) with that in operating machine components (tribo-oxidation). It will use advanced test rigs and lubricant and surface analytical methods available at Imperial College and study degradation both in-situ in test rigs and ex-situ.  The aim is to understand the underlying mechanisms of tribo-oxidation and how these differ from autooxidation. The ultimate goal is to develop improved lubricant life predictions and longer-lasting lubricants.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a degree in Chemistry, Chemical or Mechanical Engineering or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Good team-working, observational, written and oral communication skills are essential. You will be required to communicate with the industrial partners, will have the opportunity to attend multiple international conferences in Europe, US and Japan during your PhD and publish your work in major scientific journals.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/research/

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Kadiric at [Email Address Removed]. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be assessed by College Registry.

 Closing date: until post filled


Engineering (12)

Funding Notes

This is an industrially supported studentship for a period of 3.5 years, with all project costs and a bursary of ca. £25,000 per annum covered by one of our industrial partners.