University of Reading Featured PhD Programmes
University of Southampton Featured PhD Programmes
University College London Featured PhD Programmes

Quantum Many-Body Scars and Weak Ergodicity Breaking in Rydberg-Atom Quantum Simulators


   Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences


About the Project

A perennial mystery of nature is how order can exist amidst chaos. Familiar systems such as the clock pendulum exhibit regular periodic motion. This ordered behaviour, however, is fragile. For example, interactions between particles rapidly lead to chaos, forcing the system to thermalise and forget its initial state. This can be visualised as an ice cream that melts away and never finds its way back to the frozen state. Quantum scars refer to the surprising behaviour that defies such common intuition: for special initial states, the ice cream periodically melts away and then freezes up again. Recent experiments on ultracold Rydberg atoms have found evidence of similar behaviour where the atoms were able to return to their initial state many times during the measurement. At this point, the origins of quantum many-body scars largely remain a mystery. Your project will develop computer simulations of quantum many-body scars in systems of ultra cold atoms in optical lattices, with the goal of predicting future experiments on these systems that may unlock a range of applications in the emerging quantum technologies. 

Further information regarding the project and how to apply can be found on our website.


Funding Notes

A highly competitive Leverhulme Trust, 4 Year PhD Studentship paying academic fees at the Home Fee Rate of £4,600 in Session 2021/22, together with a maintenance grant of £16,170 for 4 years. This opportunity is open to UK applicants only. All candidates will be placed into the Leverhulme Trust Studentship and selection is based on academic merit.

Email Now


Search Suggestions
Search suggestions

Based on your current searches we recommend the following search filters.