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The development, characterisation, and application of perfect, pure, and functionalised diamond


   Department of Physics

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  Prof M E Newton, Dr R Beanland, Dr B Green  No more applications being accepted  Funded PhD Project (UK Students Only)

About the Project

The development, characterisation, and application of perfect, pure, and functionalised diamond.

Diamond is the epitome of a multi-functional advanced material and its extreme properties have already enabled technology and performance advances in many fields, including increased laser and microwave power densities in industrial cutting and fusion applications, in fundamental quantum information processing and communication, magnetic and electric field sensing, and radiation-hard particle detectors. Improved diamond material is at the core of all these applications. Despite diamond’s success, there are significant synthesis, processing and integration challenges which currently prohibit the full exploitation of diamond’s superlative properties.

The project will involve but is not limited to:

  • Working in a team of experienced academic and industrial researchers focussed on the development of single crystal (SC) diamond grown by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) which has exceptionally high purity and very low numbers of extended defects (dislocations).
  • Characterising the nature and properties of point defects and dislocations in SC CVD diamond. Dislocations generate local strain degrading the exploitable properties of the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defect and other functional point defects, introduce optical birefringence, parasitic current leakage paths, and unwanted background luminescence. This will involve using a variety of optical spectroscopic techniques, specialised sample preparation and high-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).
  • Characterisation of the new intrinsic diamond material and samples functionalised with point defects useful for quantum computing, communication, and sensing applications. This will involve using a variety “single defect” optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques to interrogate the quantum properties of individual point defects.

The research will be carried out in the Physics Department at Warwick in close collaboration with our industrial partner Element Six. This project is supported by the recently funded UKRI/EPSRC Engineered Diamond Technologies Prosperity Partnership grant – which aims to advance and solidify the UK’s world-leading role in diamond technologies to develop solutions where no other material is capable – and the Warwick Centre for Doctoral Training in Diamond Science and Technology. The project will exploit the world-leading diamond synthesis capabilities of Element Six and Warwick’s pioneering expertise in defect and material characterisation, and micro/nanofabrication of devices based on diamond. The student will join the Prosperity Partnership team (which consists of 5 academic research groups spread across Warwick Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and benefit from interactions with over 40 researchers in the wider diamond community at Warwick.

Applicants must have (or expect to obtain) at least the equivalent of a UK first or upper second-class degree in Physics (or related subjects). The studentship will commence in October 2022 (although an earlier start is possible based on your availability) and for UK students will provide funding for tuition fees and a maintenance grant at the standard UKRI rate, currently £15,609 for the 2022/23 academic year. Funding may be available on a competitive basis to exceptional students of any citizenship. Applications are welcome to those able to support themselves or with funding already arranged. Such applications will go through the same level of academic assessment. For further details please contact Prof Mark Newton ([Email Address Removed]) and [Email Address Removed], and provide a CV.


Funding Notes

The studentship will commence in October 2022 (although an earlier start is possible based on your availability) and for UK students will provide funding for tuition fees and a maintenance grant at the standard UKRI rate, currently £15,609 for the 2022/23 academic year. Funding may be available on a competitive basis to exceptional students of any citizenship. Applications are welcome to those able to support themselves or with funding already arranged. Such applications will go through the same level of academic assessment. For further details please contact Prof Mark Newton ([Email Address Removed]) and [Email Address Removed], and provide a CV

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