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The DNA damage response in neurological disease


Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences

About the Project

DNA damage is a consistent feature of neurological disorders. These include chronic late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as dementia, and also acute disorders such as trauma to the central nervous system. We have shown that suppressing DNA damage signalling leads to improved neural function in models of neurological disease (Tuxworth et al, 2019. Brain Comms. https://doi.org/10.1093/braincomms/fcz005). This project will investigate how and why the DNA damage occurs and how the nervous system responds to the damage. Using a combination of neuronal cell culture; Drosophila neurobiology and genetics; mammalian in vivo models of neurological disease; and genomics and gene editing tools, the student will ask how chronic DNA damage signalling in neurological diseases leads to changes in transcription and chromatin structure and how these changes might be used therapeutically.

Funding Notes

Self-funded applicants only. Applicants must have evidence of funding for University tuition fees, living expenses and research expenses.

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