University of Edinburgh Featured PhD Programmes
Birkbeck, University of London Featured PhD Programmes
Life Science Zurich Graduate School Featured PhD Programmes

The role of sex hormones and brain activity in risk-taking and antisocial behaviour in adolescence


Department of Psychology

About the Project

While there are a number of reasons to hypothesise that circulating testosterone performs an important role in many risky behaviours, the findings of empirical studies remain unclear. It is likely that testosterone levels interact with other factors in the environment and may be the consequence of behaviour as well as a cause. In this project students might measure levels of circulating testosterone in saliva and examine their function in contexts such as antisocial behaviour (aggression, delinquency), risky driving behaviour, or in sports performance. This work will happen in parallel to investigating the neural mechanisms, using EEG, that may mediate circulating testosterone effects on cognition and behaviour.

Initial reading:

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., Worthman, C. M., Costello, E. J., & Angold, A. (2004). Testosterone, antisocial behavior, and social dominance in boys: Pubertal development and biosocial interaction. Biological Psychiatry, 55(5), 546-552. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2003.10.010

Duke, S. A., Balzer, B. W. R., & Steinbeck, K. S. (2014). Testosterone and Its Effects on Human Male Adolescent Mood and Behavior: A Systematic Review. Journal of Adolescent Health, 55(3), 315-322. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.05.007

Peper, J. S., Koolschijn, P. C., & Crone, E. A. (2013). Development of risk taking: contributions from adolescent testosterone and the orbito-frontal cortex. J Cogn Neurosci, 25(12), 2141-2150.

Funding Notes

Self funded or sponsored students only

NB The University has some scholarships under competition - application deadline is 29 January 2020 at 5pm. More details can be found - View Website

Start dates are October and March yearly



Email Now

Insert previous message below for editing? 
You haven’t included a message. Providing a specific message means universities will take your enquiry more seriously and helps them provide the information you need.
Why not add a message here

The information you submit to University of Sheffield will only be used by them or their data partners to deal with your enquiry, according to their privacy notice. For more information on how we use and store your data, please read our privacy statement.

* required field

Your enquiry has been emailed successfully



Search Suggestions

Search Suggestions

Based on your current searches we recommend the following search filters.



FindAPhD. Copyright 2005-2020
All rights reserved.