Norwich Research Park Featured PhD Programmes
Queen’s University Belfast Featured PhD Programmes
University of Cambridge Featured PhD Programmes

To increase understanding of the health benefits of self-compassion in the context of chronic illness and other long-term health conditions


   Department of Psychology


About the Project

Current theory indicates that the self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness components of self-compassion can foster adaptive responses to the perceived setbacks and shortcomings that people experience in the context of living with a chronic illness. A growing evidence base also indicates that self-compassion is associated with more frequent practice of health-promoting behaviours in healthy populations. Yet research on self-compassion in relation to health has been examined primarily within non-medical populations.
This PhD project will aim to increase understanding of the health benefits of self-compassion in the context of chronic illness and other long-term health conditions by examining the processes linking dispositional and induced self-compassion to coping, the practice of health-promoting behaviours, and responses to physical symptoms.

Funding Notes

Self funded or externally sponsored students only. Intakes are usually October and March annually.

NB The University has some scholarships under competition each year. More details can be found - View Website

References

Suggested readings:
Pinto-Gouveia, J., Duarte, C., Matos, M., & Fráguas, S. (2014). The Protective Role of Self-compassion in Relation to Psychopathology Symptoms and Quality of Life in Chronic Illness and in Cancer Patients. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 21(4), 311-323. doi:10.1002/cpp.1838
Sirois, F. M., & Rowse, G. (2016). The role of self-compassion in chronic illness care. Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management, 23, 521-527. http://www.turner-white.com/pdf/jcom_nov16_compassion.pdf
Sirois, F. M., Molnar, D. S., & Hirsch, J. K. (2015). Self-compassion, stress, and coping in the context of chronic illness. Self and Identity, 1-14. doi:10.1080/15298868.2014.996249

Email Now