Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
Gdansk University of Technology Featured PhD Programmes
Queen’s University Belfast Featured PhD Programmes

Understanding Life in the Freezer: locomotor performance as the key to understanding the possible influences of climate change in high Arctic species


   Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health

  ,  Applications accepted all year round  Self-Funded PhD Students Only

About the Project

Scientific research has focused on the Arctic recently as this region is at high risk from the effects of climate change. However, a major challenge holds back our ability to understand the potential impacts of environmental change; our lack of knowledge about what animals do in the wild. Animal energy budgets are linked to species survival and are composed of various factors including the cost of locomotion. These costs associated with activities such as walking and running are likely to be significant as the predicted outcomes for the effects of climate change are shifts in the amounts of time apportioned to different activities. Maintaining an energy balance is vital to the energy conservation and evolutionary fitness of all organisms. However, our current understanding of the basic physiology of many of the animals living in this region is not sufficient to allow inferences into the possible effects of climate change to be properly assessed. This project will focus on two endemic Arctic species; the Svalbard reindeer and ptarmigan and will seek to understand the impact of route choice and decision making on their daily activity and energetic budgets in the context of a changing environment.

Entry Requirements

Candidates are expected to hold (or be about to obtain) a minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in a related area/subject. Candidates with previous laboratory experience, particularly in cell culture and molecular biology, are particularly encouraged to apply.

How To Apply

For information on how to apply for this project, please visit the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health Doctoral Academy website (https://www.bmh.manchester.ac.uk/study/research/apply/). Informal enquiries may be made directly to the primary supervisor. On the online application form select PhD Genetics

For international students, we also offer a unique 4 year PhD programme that gives you the opportunity to undertake an accredited Teaching Certificate whilst carrying out an independent research project across a range of biological, medical and health sciences.

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

Equality, diversity and inclusion is fundamental to the success of The University of Manchester, and is at the heart of all of our activities. The full Equality, diversity and inclusion statement can be found on the website https://www.bmh.manchester.ac.uk/study/research/apply/equality-diversity-inclusion/”

For international students we also offer a unique 4 year PhD programme that gives you the opportunity to undertake an accredited Teaching Certificate whilst carrying out an independent research project across a range of biological, medical and health sciences. For more information please visit http://www.internationalphd.manchester.ac.uk


Funding Notes

This project has a Band 3 fee. Details of our different fee bands can be found on our website (View Website).

References

1. Marmol Guijarro AC, Nudds RL, Folkow LP, Sellers WI, Falkingham P & Codd JR (2021) The influence of snow properties on speed and gait in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan. Int. Org. Biol. 3(1): 1-11 (https://doi.org/10.1093/iob/obab021).
2. Marmol Guijarro AC, Nudds RL, Folkow LP & Codd JR (2020) Examining the accuracy of trackways for predicting gait selection and speed of locomotion. Frontiers Zool. 17: 17 (https://doi.org/10.1186/s12983-020-00363-z).
3. Marmol Guijarro AC, Nudds RL, Marrin J, Folkow LP & Codd JR (2019) Terrestrial locomotion of the Svalbard rock ptarmigan: comparing field and treadmill studies Nature Sci. Reports 9:11451. (https://10.1038/s41598-019-47989-6).
4. Wareing K, Tickle PG, Stokkan K-A, Codd JR & Sellers WI (2011) The musculoskeletal anatomy of the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus): fore- and hind-limb. Polar Biol. 34: 1571-1578 (doi:10.1007/s00300-011-1017-y).

Email Now


Search Suggestions
Search suggestions

Based on your current searches we recommend the following search filters.

PhD saved successfully
View saved PhDs