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University of Reading, School of Biological Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 61 University of Reading, School of Biological Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  The molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and haemostasis
  Dr C.E. Hughes
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

A healthy cardiovascular system relies on the cells lining the blood vessels (endothelial cells) and heart cells (cardiomyocytes) to function normally.
  The molecular mechanisms underpinning individual variation in platelet function and their effect on the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease.
  Dr CI Jones
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Platelets are small blood cells that play a vital role in the chronic and acute progression of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). Platelets respond to a range of agonists, which are released when blood vessels are damaged, by aggregating together to form thrombi.
  The non-human biological trace evidence of shallow graves
  Dr M A Perotti
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

"A number of non-human biological traces are present in or around corpses shallowly buried in soil. This project attempts to characterize the different types of traces, and inform on the role they can play in the forensic analysis of a crime scene.
  The regulation of platelet function - towards new strategies to prevent thrombosis
  Prof J M Gibbins
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Platelets perform a pivotal role in the regulation of haemostasis, a physiological response to injury that prevents excessive bleeding.
  The relationship between dietary iron and zinc, and the gut microbiota: Can dietary iron and zinc regime be exploited to improve health?
  Prof S C Andrews
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

"The gut microbiota (100 trillion cells) outnumber human cells by 10 to 1. Its composition of around 500 to 1000 species is specific for each individual and is dynamic, changing with age, health and diet.
  The role of insect-plant-fungus interactions in natural and managed systems
  Dr P E Hatcher
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Plants are attacked both by insects and pathogenic fungi, often at the same time, yet these are often studied by different specialists.
  Ubiquitin-dependent signalling pathways in ageing
  Dr E Kevei
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Ageing is characterized by a general functional decline of cells with increased risk of disease. Maintenance of protein homeostasis is a long-term challenge not only for individual cells but also for the entire organism.
  Understanding extinction risk in the Anthropocene
  Dr M Gonzalez-Suarez
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

We live in a humanized world in which even the most remote areas have been affected by the actions of our species. Human impacts have caused a widespread loss of biodiversity, to the point that we have likely entered the sixth mass extinction event on Earth, the first primarily caused by humans.
  Understanding the Electric Field in Electrical Stimulation for biomedical application
  Prof W Holderbaum, Prof S Nasuto
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

"Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a treatment that applies small electrical charges to a muscle that has become paralysed or weakened, due to damage in your brain or spinal cord.
  Understanding the link between healthy ageing and social interaction
  Dr E Kevei, Dr N Vasudevan
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Healthy ageing is a priority for all countries since we are living longer than ever before. A number of studies show that social behaviours can prevent some detrimental aspects of aging such as dementia and memory loss.
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