Postgrad LIVE! Study Fairs

Birmingham | Edinburgh | Liverpool | Sheffield | Southampton | Bristol

CeMM Featured PhD Programmes
University of Glasgow Featured PhD Programmes
University of Kent Featured PhD Programmes
University of Kent Featured PhD Programmes
University College London Featured PhD Programmes
10 miles

University of Liverpool, School of Environmental Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 28 University of Liverpool, School of Environmental Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

  • University of Liverpool
  • School of Environmental Sciences×
  • clear all
Order by 
Showing 1 to 10 of 28
  Anatomy of subduction megathrust: a unique view from deep drilling into the Nankai Trough, Japan
  Prof D Faulkner, Dr J Bedford, Dr E Mariani
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
Subduction zone megathrust earthquakes are the largest and most destructive on earth, with many rupturing the seafloor and generating devastating tsunamis such as that produced after the M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in 2011.
  Before the Inner Core? Palaeomagnetic field intensity measurements from Proterozoic-aged Scandinavian igneous and baked Rocks
  Prof A Biggin, Dr M Hill, Dr G Paterson, Dr J Salminen
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
The Proterozoic Eon (540 – 2500 million years ago) is the single largest in Earth’s history but very little is known about how the Earth’s magnetic field was behaving at this time.
  Calving behaviour, glacier dynamics and glacier stability in Greenland
  Dr J Lea, Dr N Leonardi, Prof D Mair
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
Introduction. The calving of icebergs represent a varied range of processes that are currently too complex to be fully integrated into large scale ice sheet models (Benn et al., 2007; 2017).
  Can periodic sediment input signals make it through to the sedimentary archive?
  Dr R Duller, Prof P Burgess, Dr R Jerrett, Dr K Straub
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
Introduction. “How can we accurately decode a sedimentary succession for periodic input sediment supply signals if we have gaps in the succession and signals are shredded?” A common assumption in stratigraphic analysis is the stratigraphic record presents us with an unbiased record of past landscapes & climate.
  Changes in metabolic energy use with body sizes within pelagic invertebrate species: new insights from jellyfish
  Prof A Hirst, Dr D Atkinson
Application Deadline: 9 January 2019
Background. Gelatinous zooplankton (‘jellyfish’) have a body water content that is proportionately very high, a trait that has evolved in at least 5 planktonic phyla.
  Earthquake-induced instabilities in orogenic and volcanic environments
  Prof Y Lavallee, Dr J Kendrick, Ms L.N Schaefer
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
Landslides and sector collapses are frequent consequences of tectonic earthquakes (Keefer, 1984, 2002), and represent an important secondary hazard, costing the economy ~$2 billion annually in damage and causing thousands of fatalities in the last century.
  Erosion hazards in a changing climate: making inland communities more resilient
  Dr J Cooper, Prof A Plater, Prof J Hooke, Mr D Viner
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
This modelling project aims to quantify how future climate scenarios will affect the frequency and severity of erosion hazards in catchments, the vulnerability of key rural infrastructure and how we might best mitigate their impact.
  Fault systems and fluid-rock interaction in the Samail peridotite: implications for carbon capture in mantle rocks.
  Dr E Mariani, Prof J Wheeler, Prof L Crispini, Prof D Teagle
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
The Samail peridotite in the Oman Mountains is namely one of the largest peridotite bodies exposed on land and it was emplaced by obduction of oceanic lithosphere between 95 and 70 Ma (e.g Searle et al.
  Feeling hot, hot, hot! Harnessing energy from magma in New Zealand
  Dr J Kavanagh, Dr B Edwards, Dr G Kilgour
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
Climate change, rising global populations, increasing energy consumption, and depletion of oil and gas reservoirs mean the exploitation of renewable energy resources, such as geothermal energy, is becoming increasingly important.
  Geophysical and stratigraphical evidence for sediment dynamics and catchment landscape evolution in UK lake basins
  Prof R Chiverell, Prof a Biggin, Dr R Smedley
Application Deadline: 23 January 2019
Understanding the evolution of landscapes is important. They record the complex interplay of natural processes, extreme events (magnitude and frequency), and with the intensification of land use, anthropogenic influences.
Show 10 15 30 per page


FindAPhD. Copyright 2005-2018
All rights reserved.