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University of East Anglia, School of Psychology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 12 University of East Anglia, School of Psychology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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School of Psychology  University of East Anglia

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We have 12 University of East Anglia, School of Psychology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Neural mechanisms of compulsivity in humans (VAGHIM_U23PSY)

Dr Matilde Vaghi is recruiting a PhD student to investigate the cognitive and neural processes that underpin compulsive behaviours, which are often seen across a range of mental health disorders such as for example Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Read more

Predictive Processing Across Sensory Modalities (SMITHF_U23PSY:)

It is often assumed that early sensory brain regions passively register the sensory input present in the world. However Predictive Processing theories assert that a major function of these regions is to use contextual information to create predictions of upcoming input. Read more

Sleep and early cognitive development (GLIGAT_U23PSY)

The developing brain spends many hours asleep, an active state which we now know to be critical for learning. Yet, even in the first years of life, there are large differences in how long or how deeply infants sleep. Read more

Spatial language and spatial cognition (COVENTRYK_U23PSY)

Talking about where objects are located (e.g. in the cup; in front of the cinema; to the left of the stapler; this phone, etc.) is an essential part of language and is underpinned by both linguistic and visuospatial brain networks. Read more

Language and Concepts at the start of life: learning in naturalistic settings (ALTHAUSN_U23PSY)

How does language help young infants learn about structure in the world? Does word learning shape their categorisation skills? While recent research has provided plenty of insight into these questions, much of what we know relies on lab-based procedures. Read more

Autism and Biophilia: the impact of natural scenes on anxiety (MELVIN_PSY23SENSS)

Project background. Biophilia is the hypothesis that a love of plants and nature is not a learned trait, but rather a genetically-based affinity that evolved over the course of human evolution (Kellert & Wilson, 1993). Read more
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