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immunotherapy PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 12 immunotherapy PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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We have 12 immunotherapy PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Immunotherapy: Killing Cancer using Dead Virus

It is now accepted that our immune systems can hold the key to treating otherwise incurable cancers. So-called “immunotherapy” is an increasingly common method of treating tumours, leading to impressive increases in patient responses. . Read more

Immunotherapy: Manipulating T cell metabolism to improve anti-tumour immunity

The induction of immune responses to tumours can provide long-lasting protection from cancer. In this regard, T cells can suppress tumour growth by directly killing cancer cells and by producing inflammatory cytokines. Read more

Develop single-cell biomechanical nanotools for novel cardiovascular mechanobiology and cancer immunotherapy

In view of the high complexity and dynamics of protein complexes that perform important physiological functions, it is difficult to visualise and characterise their kinetic and signaling processes on single living cells using traditional biochemical and biophysical techniques. Read more

CAR T cell Immune Therapy for Cancer: Mechanisms and Dynamics explored by Microscopy

Applications are invited for a research studentship leading to the award of a PhD degree. The project will be based in Prof. Dan Davis’s laboratory, based in the South Kensington campus of Imperial College London, funded by a collaboration with the pharmaceutical company Bristol Myers Squibb, based in the USA. Read more

Cancer: Understanding the immunosuppressive role of fibroblast and macrophages in Breast cancer

Oncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and kill cancer cells, and their clinical efficacy has been demonstrated against a number of different cancers. The most clinically advanced OV is a genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (T-VEC) which expresses GMCSF to aid the development of anti-tumour immune responses; T-VEC is approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Read more
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