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We have 34 Psychology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships for Self-funded Students in Sheffield

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Discipline

Psychology

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Location

Sheffield  United Kingdom

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I am a self funded student


Psychology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships for Self-funded Students in Sheffield

We have 34 Psychology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships for Self-funded Students in Sheffield

Cognitive performance in videogame players and esports athletes

Previous research suggests that playing action videogames, especially first-person shooters such as Counter-Strike, is related to cognitive performance, including attention, executive functions, and information processing speed (e.g., Bediou et al., 2023). Read more

Understanding and intervening in young driver road safety

Newly-qualified drivers are the most likely drivers on the road to be involved in crashes. This is likely to reflect a combination of insufficient driving skill and deliberately choosing a risky driving style (e.g., speeding, dangerous overtaking). Read more

Analysing Big Data to Understand Learning

I have access to large existing data sets which contain the potential to show skill development on real-world tasks for large numbers of people (i.e. Read more

Using Brain Computer Interface to Improve Cognitive Performance

Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a non-invasive technique commonly used to measure brain activity. In this project, we aim at using EEG Biofeedback (brain-computer interface (BCI)) for improving cognitive performance (e.g. Read more

PhD Scholarships at the Management School

A stimulating and dynamic research environment. As part of the Russell Group of research intensive universities, we are dedicated to conducting socially responsible and impactful research. Read more

Understanding the mechanisms underlying cognitive training effects

Can the repetitive practice of cognitive tasks – as in ’brain training’ programs – effectively enhance cognitive abilities such as reasoning? After more than 20 years of intensive research efforts, this question is still highly controversial, with prior studies and meta-analyses yielding inconsistent results. Read more

Improving road safety in low- and middle- income countries

Ninety percent of the globe’s road traffic fatalities are located in Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs) but the majority of research available to date addresses driver behaviour in high income countries. Read more

Heterogeneity in the development of antisocial behaviour

Antisocial behaviour is a very wide-ranging term including fighting, stealing, and temper tantrums among many other things. It may not make sense to consider these behaviours as a single construct but to identify meaningful subsets that may have different causes, outcomes and respond well to different treatments. Read more

Weight stigma and health behaviours

Obesity is one of society’s greatest challenges with 2/3rds of UK adults being overweight or obese. Weight stigma (anti-fat attitudes, weight-based prejudice and discrimination) is experienced by 54% of adults and deters individuals from engaging in healthy behaviours targeted in obesity interventions (e.g. Read more

Using pharmacological agents to investigate the mechanisms of the neuronal vascular coupling

The changes in cerebral blood flow, volume and oxygenation that accompany increases in neural activity form the basis of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques such as blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) which allow human brain mapping. Read more

Understanding the neural basis of ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder, however the neural changes that underlie the disorder are poorly understood. Read more

Understanding neurovascular coupling and its importance in the interpretation of modern neuroimaging techniques

During the past two decades, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the scientific technique of choice for investigating human brain function in the field of cognitive neuroscience. Read more

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