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We have 13 Social Geography PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Social Geography PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 13 Social Geography PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

PhD in Social Geography

Social Geography is a branch of Human Geography that studies the interaction between society and space. PhD candidates in Social Geography investigate the ways in which social phenomena such as migration and demographic change impact human environments, as well as how spatial conditions impact the development of societies.

What’s it like to study a PhD in Social Geography?

With the guidance of an expert supervisor, you’ll work towards an extended dissertation that should make a significant, original contribution to the field of Social Geography.

Possible research areas include:

  • Tourism
  • Globalisation
  • Migration
  • Environmental conservation
  • Food environments
  • Urbanisation

Most of your time as a PhD candidate in Social Geography will likely be spent carrying out independent research. You might use methods such as surveys, interviews, focus groups, field studies, and participant observation. Some Social Geographers also gather data using technologies such as Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing.

Alongside your research, you may be required to attend training, and assist with departmental duties such as undergraduate teaching.

You may have the opportunity to publish your work in academic journals or present your work at conferences.

PhD in Social Geography entry Requirements

The minimum entry requirement for PhD projects in Geography is usually a 2:1 Bachelors degree in a relevant discipline, though a Masters degree is occasionally required. Applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis, so it’s likely that a postgraduate qualification will be an advantage, even if it is not required.

PhD in Social Geography funding options

The Research Council responsible for funding most Social Geography PhDs in the UK is the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), but depending on the focus of your project, you may also be able to apply for funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Research councils provide fully funded studentships that include coverage of your tuition fees, along with a stipend to cover living expenses. Advertised Geography PhDs will often have studentships attached. Students proposing their own research project may be able to apply for a studentship after being accepted onto a programme.

Many Social Geography PhD programmes, however, will only accept self-funded students. Options for independently financing your PhD include the UK government’s doctoral loan, part-time employment alongside your studies and support from charities or trusts.

PhD in Social Geography Careers

Many PhD graduates in Social Geography will go on to pursue and career in research, but you’ll also be well-qualified to seek work in numerous other fields such as urban planning, local or national government, consultancy or market research.

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The Organisation and Impact of National Systems of Labour Administration

  Research Group: Centre for Decent Work
Project description. The project will focus on national systems of labour administration, i.e. public administration activities in the field of national labour policy, as defined by the ILO’s Convention No 150. Read more

Understanding the economy-wide implications of different policy actions to address barriers and improving the outcomes of adopting energy efficiency improvement measures

Project Description. An exciting, 3-year full-time funded PhD studentship opportunity has arisen at the Centre for Energy Policy, at the University of Strathclyde for a project expanding CEP’s portfolio of research on energy efficiency in residential properties. Read more

Volunteering in a changing development cooperation landscape (RDFC24/EE/GES/BAILLIE)

The climate emergency, decolonisation, reduced aid budgets and the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic are challenging the ideas and practices of development organisations whose work has been structured around sending volunteering from the global North to the South. Read more

What role for the voluntary and community sector in promoting community resilience?

The recently published UK Government Resilience Framework (Cabinet Office 2022) renews a commitment to a “whole-of-society” approach where strengthened partnerships with the voluntary and community sector (VCS) are seen as an important way of protecting communities. Read more

Valuing green and blue urban landscapes

During this prolonged period of neo-liberal development our discourse in the West has become fragmented between a growing concern for climate change/sustainability and a continued need to promote intensive growth and prioritise the needs of capital. Read more

Evaluating the Just Transition to effect policy change

It is an undeniable fact that the world faces environmental and climate crises of epic proportions. What is also clear to see is the social and political impacts of these crises across states and societies. Read more
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