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Analytical Chemistry PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

We have 15 Analytical Chemistry PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

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  Quantifying Hydrothermal Exchanges between Seawater and the Lower Oceanic Crust: Evidence from the Oman Drilling Project
  Prof D Teagle, Dr B Thornton, Dr R.M. Coggon, Dr J Matter
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Thermal and chemical exchanges between the oceans and the oceanic crust during hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges exert major controls on the chemistry of seawater.
  Ocean acidification monitoring using novel sensing technologies on marine autonomous platforms
  Dr S Loucaides, Dr N Lawrence, Dr M Mowlem, Dr A Nightingale
Application Deadline: 4 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution the ocean has become more acidic due to uptake of atmospheric CO2, a process that is projected to continue under current scenarios.
  Conversion of carbon dioxide into fuels for energy storage.
  Dr C.A. Ponce-de-Leon-Albarran, Dr L. Wang
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is currently 411 parts per million (ppm) and increases 2 ppm/year possibly due to fossil fuel consumption, deforestation, as well as natural processes contributing to the greenhouse effect such as global warming.
  Novel microprobes for the geochemical gradients in diffusive boundary layers around marine calcifiers
  Dr G Denault, Prof G Foster, Prof P Smith
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Diffusive boundary layers are common between any two media, e.g. at the sediment-water interface. Indeed, marine organisms, like corals and foraminifera, sense their environment through micron-scale diffusive boundary layers (DBL).
  Antarctica before ice sheets: polar climate history of past greenhouse worlds.
  Dr S Bohaty, Dr CD Hillenbrand, Assoc Prof R Levy, Prof P Wilson
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

During the extremely warm global ’greenhouse’ period 50 million years ago, Antarctica was mostly ice free and hosted temperate forests in coastal regions of the continent.
  Provision or Poison? Biogeochemistry of sediments in a warming ocean
  Dr A Annett, Dr J Godbold
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The importance of sediment processes in driving biogeochemical cycles, from blue carbon storage, to nutrients (silica, iron) and pollutants (lead, arsenic), are becoming increasingly recognized, from local to global scale [1].
  Not just going with the flow: does biological production rather than deep water formation drive the Southern Ocean carbon sink?
  Dr P Brown, Prof A Naveira-Garabato, Dr N Briggs
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Southern Ocean (SO) is thought to have absorbed ~40% of all global human-derived (anthropogenic) carbon dioxide and >75% of anthropogenic heat, thus being disproportionately influential in mitigating increasing atmospheric CO2 levels and related climate effects.
  Forams in the laser sights – getting the most out of laser ablation ICPMS analysis of planktic foraminifera
  Dr T Ezard, Prof G Foster, Dr JA Milton
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Planktic foraminifera are unicellular protists that secrete a 100-1000 m multi-chambered shell during their four week life cycle.
  Abrupt climate change during the last deglaciation: linking records from Greenland to central Europe.
  Prof A Kemp, Prof PG Langdon, Dr J Whiteside
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The last deglaciation (16,000 – 11,000 years ago) was Earth’s most recent massive climate change but its dynamics are not adequately understood.
  Multimodal imaging of airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution as a means of source apportionment
  Prof G Foster, Dr M Loxham, Dr R B Cook, Dr JA Milton
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Airborne particulate matter (PM) is a key risk factor for premature death (8.9 million per annum worldwide) and reduced quality of life due to a range of diseases of the respiratory and cardiovascular system, with growing evidence for roles in metabolic and cognitive impairments [1].
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