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Chemical Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

We have 69 Chemical Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

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  Development of a PMMA- ZrO2 core shell composite for the next generation bone cement
  Research Group: nCATS
  Dr R B Cook
Application Deadline: 31 August 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Supervisor. Dr. Richard Cook. Co-supervisor Prof. Andrew Hector, Prof. Martin Browne. Project description. Applications are invited for a fully-funded industrially sponsored multidisciplinary PhD aiming to develop a new bone cement formulation for use in orthopaedic surgery.
  Closing loopholes in the nitrogen cycle: Nitrification now and in the future
  Dr A Yool, Prof T Tyrrell, Dr A Martin, Prof N Bates
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Nitrification ( oxidation) of ammonia (NH3) back to nitrate (NO3-) is an important regenerative step in the nitrogen cycles of both marine and terrestrial systems.
  Catastrophic change to Earth’s magnetic field
  Dr C Xuan, Prof P Wilson, Dr G Hellio
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Earth’s magnetic field provides a protective shield from harmful effects of the solar wind, but field strength and behaviour are constantly changing.
  Asian Monsoon drought and flood intensity: testing predicted response to changes in global warmth and polar ice volume
  Prof P Wilson, Dr C Xuan, Dr A Crocker
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Asian Monsoon (AM) is a major component of the global climate system, affecting the lives of four billion people. Chinese cave deposits suggest [1] that AM intensity is strongly influenced by orbitally forced changes in insolation but only weakly affected by glacial–interglacial cycles.
  The Ultimate Limiting Nutrient for Oceanic Primary Production
  Prof T Tyrrell, Dr A Yool, Dr J Wilson
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. In order to know how Earth’s climate system works, we need to understand what controls oceanic primary production.
  Quantification of benthic invertebrate burrow architecture
  Prof M Solan, Dr J Leyland, Dr J Godbold, Mr M Mavrogordato
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Marine sediments provide habitat for a wide range of organisms and exploitation of this three-dimensional environment is important in mediating major ecosystem properties.
  Use of B and Li isotopes to better understand the fate of lithium in crustal environments
  Prof S Roberts, Prof R Herrington, Prof M Palmer
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Lithium is vital to the production of rechargeable batteries used in a range of products from grid backups to electric vehicles to mobile phones.
  Quantifying Hydrothermal Exchanges between Seawater and the Lower Oceanic Crust: Evidence from the Oman Drilling Project
  Prof D Teagle, Dr B Thornton, Dr R.M. Coggon, Dr J Matter
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Thermal and chemical exchanges between the oceans and the oceanic crust during hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges exert major controls on the chemistry of seawater.
  Where did all the carbon go? Understanding and predicting carbon inventories in coarse sediments
  Dr C Thompson, Dr R Parker
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

‘Blue carbon’ (BC), or carbon stored long-term in marine environments, is receiving increasing attention from scientists and policy makers, in terms of its capacity to mitigate against climate change by storing CO2and the potential to value these systems as a method of off-setting carbon emissions.
  Ocean acidification monitoring using novel sensing technologies on marine autonomous platforms
  Dr S Loucaides, Dr N Lawrence, Dr M Mowlem, Dr A Nightingale
Application Deadline: 4 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution the ocean has become more acidic due to uptake of atmospheric CO2, a process that is projected to continue under current scenarios.
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