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Geochemistry PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

We have 32 Geochemistry PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

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  Quantifying Hydrothermal Exchanges between Seawater and the Lower Oceanic Crust: Evidence from the Oman Drilling Project
  Prof D Teagle, Dr B Thornton, Dr R.M. Coggon, Dr J Matter
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Thermal and chemical exchanges between the oceans and the oceanic crust during hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges exert major controls on the chemistry of seawater.
  Climate Change, Plate Tectonics and Machine Learning
  Dr C Rychert, Dr J Whiteside
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Our understanding of the transition from the lithospheric plate to the weaker asthenosphere has recently been revolutionized by seismic imaging that finds a sharp, strong discontinuity at the base of the plate.
  Determining Earth’s Volatile Cycling using Machine Learning
  Dr C Rychert, Dr T Henstock
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Earth’s volatile cycle is fundamental to human existence on the planet. However, precise constraints on this system have proved challenging.
  Caribbean Subduction: Seismic Imaging of Melt and Volatiles in the Lesser Antilles with joint inversion, full-waveform, and machine learning approaches
  Dr C Rychert, Dr T Henstock
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Dense oceanic tectonic plates sink beneath buoyant continental plates at subduction zones. The ocean plate adds volatiles like water to the mantle, lowering the melting temperature, and enabling melting and eventually creating volcanoes at Earth’s surface.
  Quantifying Variations in Hydrothermal Contributions to the Oceans:Scaling from drill core observations to global models
  Dr R.M. Coggon, Prof D Teagle, Dr B Thornton
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Ocean chemistry reflects a dynamic balance between riverine inputs, biological processing, sediment burial, and hydrothermal exchanges with ocean crust.
  Geophysical properties of seafloor hydrate reservoirs
  Dr A Best, Dr S Sahoo, Dr L North, Prof T Minshull
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Globally, seafloor gas hydrates offer a strategic source of natural gas that may be equivalent in size to all known conventional gas reserves.
  Molecular mechanisms of adaptation in globally successful cyanobacteria
  Dr I Tews, Prof E Achterberg, Dr T Bibby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cyanobacteria are the most abundant photosynthetic organisms on the planet. Their success is rooted in a diversity of strategies that allow them to adapt to the highly varied physical and chemical marine.
  Antarctica before ice sheets: polar climate history of past greenhouse worlds.
  Dr S Bohaty, Dr CD Hillenbrand, Assoc Prof R Levy, Prof P Wilson
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

During the extremely warm global ’greenhouse’ period 50 million years ago, Antarctica was mostly ice free and hosted temperate forests in coastal regions of the continent.
  Provision or Poison? Biogeochemistry of sediments in a warming ocean
  Dr A Annett, Dr J Godbold
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The importance of sediment processes in driving biogeochemical cycles, from blue carbon storage, to nutrients (silica, iron) and pollutants (lead, arsenic), are becoming increasingly recognized, from local to global scale [1].
  Tiny fractals in the sea: the biogeochemistry of particle shape
  Dr P Lam
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Particles* are a critical aspect of life and chemistry in the ocean. Marine particles are hotspots of biological activity, and their sinking mediates a major vertical transport of mass and energy that connects the sunlit and dark ocean ecosystems and fundamentally influences global biogeochemistry.
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