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Oceanography PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

We have 69 Oceanography PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

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Showing 31 to 40 of 69
  Physical and biogeochemical controls on the marine primary productivity of the Galápagos Archipelago
  Prof A Naveira-Garabato, Dr A Forryan
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The waters surrounding the Galápagos Archipelago (GA) are an iconic biological hot spot.
  Changing Ocean Freshwater and Heat Transports and Atlantic Climate Tipping Points
  Dr J Mecking, Prof S Drijfhout, Prof P Holliday
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Abrupt climate changes can have large and devastating socio-economic impacts, therefore being able to simulate them in future climate scenarios is of great importance.
  Global phylo-epidemiology Vibrio parahaemolyticus within a context of climate change
  Prof J Martinez-Urtaza, Prof C Hauton, Dr R Marsh
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is a marine bacterium and a natural inhabitant of coastal environments worldwide.
  Fingerprinting bioactive trace elements in a changing Arctic Ocean
  Dr M Lohan, Dr A Annett
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The Arctic Ocean is undergoing dramatic environmental change and has warmed twice as fast as the rest of the planet.
  Antarctic benthic Mollusca: biodiversity, community and functional group structure in habitats influenced by varying ice-cover and the Weddell Gyre
  Dr K Linse, Dr P Fenberg, Dr H Griffiths
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The Southern Ocean (SO) and its Antarctic component are globally important in understanding how ecosystems and biodiversity respond to climate change.
  Testing the links between magmatic, tectonic and climate controls on hydrothermal activity at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge
  Dr A Lichtschlag, Dr B Murton, Prof R James
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. High temperature hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is driven mainly by magmatic heat and crystallization and responds to structural processes that open-up and maintain fluid pathways from the interior of the ocean crust to the seafloor.
  The Evolution of Fluvial Sediment Delivery from Asia’s Rivers to the Oceans: Trends and Causes
  Dr J Leyland, Prof SE Darby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. This project aims to quantify and explain variations (1985-2020) in the discharge of fluvial sediment to the oceans, with a focus on the continent of Asia.
  Microplastic characteristics, fluxes and accumulation in the Atlantic Ocean
  Prof R Lampitt, Prof A Cundy, Dr A Horton, Dr K Pabortsava
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Plastic contamination of the oceans is of considerable concern and may cause significant damage to ecosystem structure and function.
  Biogeochemical cycling of trace metals in a changing Arctic Ocean
  Prof R James, Dr H Goring-Harford, Dr M Lohan
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The Arctic Ocean is the most rapidly warming ocean on our planet, but the consequences of ice melt on primary productivity, which underpins the entire Arctic ecosystem, are not clear.
  Impact of a newly identified mechanism: pathways for Arctic freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean
  Prof P Holliday, Dr R Marsh, Dr B Sinha, Dr G Evans
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Variable seawater properties and flows in the upper 1000 m of the eastern subpolar North Atlantic are a primary control of the strength of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and the associated transport of heat that is so important for the UK and global climate (Lozier et al., 2019).
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