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Oceanography PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

We have 67 Oceanography PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Southampton

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Showing 1 to 15 of 67
  Up in smoke! Terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks during warm climates
  Dr J Whiteside, Dr I Harding
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Organic carbon preserved within sedimentary rocks (fossil OC) is a major carbon reservoir and plays a crucial role in the long-term evolution of atmospheric CO2 and O2, and thus global climate.
  Dynamic phytoplankton iron physiology and its impacts on global ecosystem function
  Dr B Ward, Dr T Bibby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Primary production couples solar energy arriving at the Earth’s surface to global biogeochemistry, linking elemental cycles together through the synthesis of organic molecules.
  Molecular mechanisms of adaptation in globally successful cyanobacteria
  Dr I Tews, Prof E Achterberg, Dr T Bibby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Cyanobacteria are the most abundant photosynthetic organisms on the planet. Their success is rooted in a diversity of strategies that allow them to adapt to the highly varied physical and chemical marine.
  Understanding variation in marine protected areas: a spatio-temporal study of species richness and oceanographic patterns across the Galápagos Islands
  Dr M Rius, Dr A Forryan, Dr J Robidart
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Human impacts across the world’s oceans are causing profound changes in ecosystem structure and species distributions.
  Using genomic data of sponges to reveal patterns of genetic diversity and connectivity in the Mediterranean Sea
  Dr A Riesgo, Dr M Rius
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Understanding the genetic diversity and connectivity patterns of marine invertebrates and how they adapt to their local environments is vital to design conservation strategies.
  The Taphonomy of Archaeological Molecular Biomarkers
  Prof A.W Pike, Prof G S Attard, Dr S Bray
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to reveal archaeologically invisible aspects of the past.
  Some theories are more equal than others: A Bayesian approach to glacial-interglacial changes in ocean carbon storage
  Dr A Marzocchi, Dr S Josey, Dr M Jansen
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Earth’s climate has undergone large transitions between cold “glacial” and warm “interglacial” stages.
  How do submesoscale physical processes influence the biological carbon pump?
  Dr A Martin, Dr S Henson, Dr P Goodwin, Dr R Taylor
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The ocean is a huge reservoir for carbon. Understanding the processes that retain it in the ocean—rather than release it to the atmosphere—is key to making accurate climate predictions.
  The physics and biology of the ocean carbon sink: how air-sea interactions affect organic carbon uptake and sequestration in the Southern Ocean.
  Dr D Jones, Dr A Martin, Prof A Naveira-Garabato, Prof E Murphy
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The water masses leaving the Southern Ocean form a major conduit of atmospheric carbon into the interior of the global ocean.
  Climate change effects on ocean biogeochemistry
  Dr S Henson, Dr A Hickman
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Human-induced climate change is expected to affect ocean biogeochemistry through increasing temperature, ocean acidification and deoxygenation.
  Temporal variability of the carbon system across the Atlantic Ocean; causes and implications
  Dr S Hartman, Dr R James, Dr P Brown, Dr A Schaap
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Approximately 25% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by fossil fuel combustion enters the ocean. Without this sink, the rate of CO2 buildup in the atmosphere would be larger than it is.
  Onshore/Offshore Seismic Imaging of the New Zealand Subduction Zone
  Dr N Harmon, Prof L McNeill, Dr C Rychert
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The behaviours and processes that occur at subduction zones inform our global understanding of plate boundary interaction at a variety of scales with broad implications for plate tectonics, volatiles cycling, seismic hazard and climate.
  Storm clustering and its influence on coastal morphology and defence.
  Dr I Haigh, Dr D Pender, Prof R Lamb, Ms J Hornsby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The coastal zone is widely recognised as important at national, European and global levels, but is facing increasing pressures from climate change.
  The death of oceanic mesoscale energy at western boundaries of ocean basins
  Dr E Frajka-Williams, Prof A Naveira-Garabato, Dr G Evans, Dr L Clement
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Mesoscale eddies – swirling vortices of water 100-200 km across—are highly energetic and ubiquitous in the world’s oceans, acting to redistribute energy and properties and potentially modulating the strength of the large-scale ocean circulation.
  Novel microprobes for the geochemical gradients in diffusive boundary layers around marine calcifiers
  Dr G Denault, Prof G Foster, Prof P Smith
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Diffusive boundary layers are common between any two media, e.g. at the sediment-water interface. Indeed, marine organisms, like corals and foraminifera, sense their environment through micron-scale diffusive boundary layers (DBL).
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