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Astrophysics PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in the UK

We have 81 Astrophysics PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in the UK

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Showing 1 to 10 of 81
  A new look at the turbulent interstellar medium
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr P Clark, Prof A Whitworth
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Supersonic turbulent motions are thought to play a major role in star formation process. Theories have suggested that ’turbulence’ is responsible for shaping the interstellar medium (ISM), regulating star formation, and even setting the masses of stars as they form in young clusters.
  Dust, gas and stars in the big neighbour
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Prof S Eales, Dr MW Smith
Applications accepted all year round
The obvious place to address questions about the interstellar gas and dust in galaxies, and how stars form out of this gas and dust, is the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest big spiral galaxy to our own.
  Dust, Gas and Stars in the Big Neighbour
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr MW Smith, Prof S Eales
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The obvious place to address questions about the interstellar gas and dust in galaxies, and how stars form out of this gas and dust, is the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest big spiral galaxy to our own.
  How do stars get their mass?
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr P Clark, Prof A Whitworth
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
A debate is raging in star formation.
  Investigating the formation of the most massive galaxies in the Universe with millimetre surveys
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Negrello, Prof S Eales
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The most massive galaxies we observe in the Universe today are believed to have formed via a giant dust-obscured burst of star formation at redshift z > 3, when the Universe was less than 2 billion years old.
  Molecules and dust formation in supernovae and supernova remnants
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Matsuura, Dr H Gomez
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Supernovae are the explosive death of high-mass stars. At this explosive event, stars eject heavy elements, such as iron, oxygen, silicon.
  Probing the intermediate-mass regime of star formation
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr N Peretto
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The initial mass function (IMF) of stars is a fundamental global output of the star formation process, and the question of its origin and universality has been a long-standing open issue.
  Rewind supernovae with machine learning
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr C Inserra
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Supernovae are catastrophic stellar explosions shaping the visible Universe. They play an important role in the synthesis and distribution of almost all elements and especially heavy elements such as iron, enriching the Universe since the first supernova explosion when the cosmos was metal-free.
  Studying the populations of nature’s brightest fireworks
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr C Inserra
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The last ten years have opened up a new parameter space in time-domain astronomy with the surprising discovery of transients defying our understanding of how stars explode.
  The Origin of Galaxies and Clusters
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Prof S Eales, Dr N Peretto, Dr S Doyle
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The first galaxies and clusters are largely hidden by interstellar dust from optical telescopes and are most easily found in submillimetre surveys, which detect the radiation from the dust.
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