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Palaeontology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in the UK

We have 26 Palaeontology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in the UK

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  Devonian Tropical Plant Assemblages from Arctic Svalbard
  Dr C Berry, Prof D Edwards, Dr L Cherns
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Background. The Devonian period (419-359 million years ago) is the critical time in Earth history when land plants evolved from being ankle high simple branched naked twigs to being leafy trees growing in complex forest ecosystems (Stein et al.
  Dinoflagellate cysts and palaeoenvironmental change during Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events: a study of OAE1a
  Prof I Jarvis, Prof G Gillmore
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

This project will study Cretaceous dinoflagellate cysts. It seeks to understand relationships between dinocysts, a proxy for marine nutrient availability and organic zooplankton fertility, and episodes of black shale (petroleum source rock) deposition during Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) in the mid-Cretaceous.
  ONE Planet DTP - Using eDNA and stable isotopes in lake sediment cores to inform wetland conservation by examining causes of decline of rare water bird species.
  Mr M Van Hardenbroek
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The UK was once home to a number of now locally extinct water bird species such as the white stork (Ciconia ciconia), Dalmatian pelican (Pelecanus crispu) and night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax).
  Carbon emissions from the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province
  Dr S Greene, Dr S Jones
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Many of the most severe climate ‘events’ and carbon cycle perturbations of the Meso-Cenozoic coincide with major episodes of volcanism linked to Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs).
  Fish like it hot? Response of fish and shark communities to abrupt past global warming
  Dr K Edgar, Dr I Sansom
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ~56 million years ago, is the largest of a series of abrupt Cenozoic global warming events.
  Global carbon cycle feedbacks from massive volcanism
  Dr S Greene, Dr S Jones
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere can trigger both positive feedbacks, adding further carbon to the atmosphere, and negative feedbacks, sequestering carbon in rocks or sediments.
  Holocene rapid climate change and vegetation response in Cappadocia, Turkey
  Dr W J Eastwood, Dr J P Sadler
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Multi-proxy approaches to integrated regional studies of environmental variability during the late Glacial and Holocene can provide valuable insights into the ways that significant shifts in climate have affected natural ecosystems, landscapes and human activities over decadal, centennial and millennial timescales.
  Microfaunal response to Early Jurassic climate cyclicity following the late Triassic mass extinction
  Dr I Boomer, Dr K Edgar
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval witnessed a marked global extinction with profound consequences for all ecosystems. Significant diversification occurred after this event but the pattern and process of recovery in marine shelf environments, particularly over the short-term, is not well known.
  New North Atlantic Palaeo-Temperature Reconstruction from Terrestrial Sedimentary Archives: Implications for the Influence of the Icelandic Plume on Oceanic Circulation and Climate
  Dr S Jones, Dr J Bendle
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Icelandic Plume is the most vigorous mantle convection cell currently within Earth’s mantle. The Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is the hotspot track of the Icelandic Plume and forms one of the most important gateways in the global circulation system.
  Tackling taxonomic and taphonomic biases in the Triassic fossil fish record
  Dr S Giles, Dr T Clements, Dr I Sansom
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Ray-finned fishes (actinopterygians) are the most diverse and successful group of vertebrates today, accounting for over half of living vertebrate species.
  Unravelling the mysteries of plate tectonics
  Dr M Maffione, Dr A R Hastie
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Plate tectonics is the most unifying and revolutionary theory in Earth sciences. However, 50 years after its formulation fundamental questions about how plate tectonics works still remain unanswered.
  Drivers of marine ecosystem change during an ancient abrupt global warming event
  Dr K Edgar, Dr R Butler
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ~56 million years ago, is the largest of a series of abrupt global warming events known from the Cenozoic.
  NERC GW4+ DTP Projects 2020: (Changing Planet) The impact of global warming on hurricane-induced storm surges in the Caribbean
  Dr R Bingham, Dr D Mitchell
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The islands of the Caribbean are particularly vulnerable to hurricanes, seen most recently during the 2017 hurricane season. Over the last 500 years, hurricanes have caused an estimated 300,000–500,000 deaths in North America and the Caribbean, predominantly in the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) of the Caribbean.
  NERC GW4+ DTP Projects 2020: (Changing Planet) The temperature of our planet – modelling and understanding 500-million years of climate change.
  Dr D Lunt, Prof P J Valdes
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Over the last 500 million years, Earth’s temperature has fluctuated considerably, from the extreme cold of the last ice age, 20,000 years ago, to the super-warmth of the mid Cretaceous, 100 million years ago.
  The origin of biomineralisation: oxygenation, nutrient cycling, and seawater chemistry
  Dr R Wood, Dr L Pichevin
Application Deadline: 9 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Summary. What were the triggers that allowed animals to form skeletons in the Cambrian Explosion?. Project background. Animals with skeletons or shells dominate our seas today, and play a key role in the long term carbon cycle.
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