We have 10 Genetics PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships for Self-funded Students in York

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Discipline

Biological Sciences

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Location

York  United Kingdom

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Institution

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PhD Type

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Funding

I am a self funded student


Genetics PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships for Self-funded Students in York

We have 10 Genetics PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships for Self-funded Students in York

Self funded MSc by research or PhD in Biology: Paratransgenesis for leishmania

Lead supervisor: Dr D Jeffares (Dept of Biology). Co-Supervisor: Dr Sean Meaden and Dr Paul Fogg (Dept of Biology). The student will be registered with the Department of Biology. Read more

Self funded MSc by Research or PhD in Biology: The oncogenic mechanism and potential of the emergent retrovirus ALV-K in global poultry

Lead supervisor: Dr Andrew Mason. The student will be registered with the Department of Biology. Background. Avian Leukosis Viruses (ALV) are oncogenic retroviruses which cause blood cancers in chickens, impacting commercial productivity and animal welfare. Read more

Self funded MSc by research or PhD in Biology: Chemical warfare in the rhizosphere: understanding the defensive role of plant root exudates against the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

Lead supervisor. Dr Andrea Harper. The student will be registered with the Department of Biology. R. solanacearum is a devastating bacterial plant pathogen that has a global distribution, wide host range, and no effective control methods. Read more

Role of the endosomal pathway in regulating sleep and circadian rhythms

Ageing and many neurodegenerative disorders are characterised by a progressive loss of neurons in particular brain regions leading to behavioural changes including cognitive decline, sleep disruption and circadian dysregulation. Read more

Common genetic origins of visual and neurocognitive disorders

There is emerging evidence that apparently distinct neurodegenerative diseases have common genetic origins. For example, genes such as ARMS2 and HTRA1, which are fundamental to regulating neuronal health, are implicated in both dementia and diseases of the retina (particularly age-related macular degeneration). Read more
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