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Physical Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in York

We have 28 Physical Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in York

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Discipline

Physical Sciences

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Location

York  United Kingdom

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We have 28 Physical Sciences PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in York

Nuclear DFT studies of atomic nuclei

  Research Group: Nuclear Physics
The tool of choice to describe properties of atomic nuclei from light to heavy and from drip-line to drip-line is the nuclear density functional theory (NDFT). Read more

Metal-mediated chemical protein modification

Chemically modified proteins can be used to understand, treat, and diagnose disease. However, relatively few chemical reactions can be used to modify proteins, severely limiting the diversity and applications of new technologies. Read more

Self-funded BMS project: Nutrient-Mediated Bacterial Delivery of ‘Dual Warhead’ Antimicrobials

Microbial resistance to antibiotics has been a growing problem. Until recently, antibiotics of the fluoroquinolone-type provided some of the most active broad-spectrum antibacterial agents on the market. Read more

Edge-Sol Coupling and Turbulence in Confinement Transitions (A Fusion CDT plasma strand project)

  Research Group: York Plasma Institute
Applications will be reviewed as they are received so we would encourage you to apply as early as possible. . Plasmas in a tokamak magnetic fusion device undergo a transition (L-H transition) from a low-confinement state (L mode) to high confinement (H mode) when heating exceeds a certain threshold value. Read more

Electrical Steels

  Research Group: Condensed Matter Physics
Electrical steels are a key component in electrical transformers. The traditional material is Fe,. due its high magnetic permeability. Read more

Deciphering the secrets of DNA condensation

  Research Group: Physics of Life - Biological Physics and Biophysics
DNA molecules repel each other in water because they contain a high density of negative charges. However, this electrostatic repulsion is reverted to an attractive force in the presence of multivalent cations which can promote DNA condensation. Read more

DNA-bending Proteins for Nanotech

  Research Group: Physics of Life - Biological Physics and Biophysics
DNA is the molecule that nature uses as genetic material and it rarely exists in a relaxed state inside cells. Read more

Self-funded BMS project: Normal and malignant blood stem cell biology

One of the simplest and most provocative concepts in all of stem cell biology is how a single stem cell can give rise to any of the highly specialised cell types of a given tissue while also having the capacity to make a new equally potent stem cell. Read more

Self-funded BMS project: Ion channel signalling in cancer cells

Our cells constantly sense and transport ions present in their environment. From embryonic development to epilepsy to heart disease to cancer, our cells’ ability to respond to changes in the ionic microenvironment is essential for healthy ageing. Read more

First principles modelling of defects in solar absorber materials

  Research Group: Condensed Matter Physics
A number of materials are emerging as promising candidates to replace silicon in the next generation of solar cells. They offer the prospect of high efficiency, low cost and flexibility allowing for their incorporation into building materials for example. Read more

Modelling the properties of electron and hole polarons in materials

  Research Group: Condensed Matter Physics
The strong coupling between electrons and phonons in some materials leads to the formation of small polarons (quasiparticles comprised of a localised electron and an associated polarisation field). Read more

Amphiphile-induced frustration in liquid crystals

Amphiphilic compounds self-organise so that the incompatible parts of the molecule are separated from one another (e.g. micelles); the exact same principle holds for liquid crystals (LCs). Read more

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