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Organosulfur Compounds and Anti-oxidant Responses: the microRNA connection

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  • Full or part time
    Dr Sexton
    Dr Kehinde Ross
  • Application Deadline
    Applications accepted all year round
  • Self-Funded PhD Students Only
    Self-Funded PhD Students Only

Project Description

Organosulphur compounds (OSCs) such as sulforaphane (SF), erucin and iberin are abundant in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and rocket. These compounds exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects in diverse cell types. Although several transcription factors have been implicated in the cellular responses OSCs, less is known about the role of the microRNA (miRNA) family of genetic molecules in OSC function. Interestingly, miRNAs regulate antioxidant pathways, such as Nrf-2 signalling, that are known targets of OSCs. However, the effects OSC on miRNA expression and function, and the effects of miRNA on OSC-dependent responses have not been fully defined. We have therefore hypothesised that OSCs modulate miRNA expression and miRNAs in turn control OSC-dependent anti-oxidant signalling pathways.

We will use neutrophils to investigate this hypothesis given their established roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders and other diseases. Techniques exploited will include cell culture, cytotoxicity assays, immunostaining, RNA interference, real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs).

Liverpool John Moores University has a comprehensive development programme for postgradaute researchers (https://www2.ljmu.ac.uk/RGSO/training/index.htm).

One of the top 3 cities to visit in the world according to the Rough Guide to 2014, Liverpool rivals the great world cities for cultural splendour, and was the first UK city outside London to be awarded the famous Blue Plaques by English Heritage. From the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, the oldest symphony orchestra in the UK, to the world-conquering Beatles, two internationally-famous football teams, and more galleries and museums than any UK city outside of London, plus an eclectic social scene of cinemas, bars and restaurants, Liverpool is a city of endless discovery.

Applications are welcome from students that are self-funded in the UK and EU.
The studentship is open to UK or EU students who are eligible for home/EU fees. Applicants must have or expect to obtain at least an upper second class (2:1) honours degree and/or a Master’s degree in Biochemistry or a related discipline. You will also need to provide evidence of competence in English language, if English is not your first language (ILETS 6.5).

For an informal discussion, please contact Dr Darren Sexton or Dr Kehinde Ross
E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected]

Funding Notes

Applications are welcome from students that are self-funded in the UK and EU.
The studentship is open to UK or EU students who are eligible for home/EU fees. Applicants must have or expect to obtain at least an upper second class (2:1) honours degree and/or a Master’s degree in Biochemistry or a related discipline. You will also need to provide evidence of competence in English language, if English is not your first language (ILETS 6.5).

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