• Aberdeen University Featured PhD Programmes
  • FindA University Ltd Featured PhD Programmes
  • Staffordshire University Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Cambridge Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Pennsylvania Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Tasmania Featured PhD Programmes
University of Liverpool Featured PhD Programmes
Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
University College London Featured PhD Programmes
University of Bristol Featured PhD Programmes
University of Tasmania Featured PhD Programmes

Shifting Shape with Cell Walls: Imaging the Dynamics of Guard Cell Movement

This project is no longer listed in the FindAPhD
database and may not be available.

Click here to search the FindAPhD database
for PhD studentship opportunities
  • Full or part time
    Dr Rhoda Hawkins
  • Application Deadline
    No more applications being accepted

About This PhD Project

Project Description

Water loss from plants is regulated by specialised guard cells on the leaf surface undergoing controlled shape change, creating pores by which gas enters and leaves the plant. We are interested in understanding how the mechanical properties of the walls regulate the dynamic properties of these cells. In this project you will use advanced imaging technology, including light sheet microscopy, to quantify changes in guard cell shape in real time, comparing shape change dynamics in a range of Arabidopsis cell wall mutants which show altered water loss. By integrating these data with knowledge of cell wall structure/function, you will contribute to the generation of mechanical models of stomatal function. Using this knowledge, is it possible to engineer guard cell walls to improve plant performance under future climate conditions of elevated carbon dioxide and restricted water availability?

The ideal candidate will have a background in biology and imaging, preferably combined with an interest in plant mechanics and modelling. The successful candidate will join an integrated group working on various aspects of leaf structure/function with a supervisory team consisting of Andrew Fleming, Julie Gray and Rhoda Hawkins.

Related Subjects

Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X