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Understanding and Addressing the Temporal Mood-Regulation Dynamics of Procrastination: Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms

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  • Full or part time
    Dr F Sirois
    Dr L Levita
  • Application Deadline
    No more applications being accepted
  • Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)
    Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)

Project Description

Recent theory and accumulating evidence portrays procrastination as reflecting an irrational intertemporal choice to avoid aversive tasks that is motivated by poor emotional regulation of stress and negative states, and a disconnection from future self. Cognitive shifts towards immediate rather than distal concerns as a result of neural-physiological activation that occurs when people are feeling stressed or anxious about a task are posited to contribute to procrastination and an ongoing pattern of avoidant coping.
This PhD project aims to advance knowledge about the temporal mood-regulation dynamics involved in procrastination by investigating the neurobiological mechanisms underlying processes of emotion mis-regulation in the avoidance of intended tasks. The involvement of positive and negative emotions in the promotion and prevention of procrastination will be examined using EEG, and psychophysiological measures of emotional reactivity, e.g., electrodermal response (EDA), heart rate, and facial EMG. The project will also examine the potential effects of developing a more compassionate and empathetic view of the present and future selves for reducing procrastination across important life domains.

Funding Notes

This is one of many projects in competition for the current funding opportunities available within the Department of Psychology. Please see here for full details: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/psychology/prospectivepg/funding
Overseas students are welcome to apply for funding but must be able to demonstrate that they can fund the difference in the tuition fees.
Requirements: We ask for a minimum of a first class or high upper second-class undergraduate honours degree and a distinction or high merit at Masters level in psychology or a related discipline.

References

Suggested readings:
Sirois, F. M., & Pychyl. T. A. (2013). Procrastination and the priority of short-term mood regulation: Consequences for future self. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7 (2), 115–127.
Sirois, F. M. (2014). Procrastination and stress: Exploring the role of self-compassion. Self and Identity, 13 (2), 128-145.
Sirois, F. M. (2014). Out of sight, out of time? A meta-analytic investigation of procrastination and time perspective. European Journal of Personality, 28, 511–520 (IF = 3.99).

How good is research at University of Sheffield in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience?

FTE Category A staff submitted: 34.45

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