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Heterogeneity in the development of antisocial behaviour

  • Full or part time
  • Application Deadline
    Wednesday, February 01, 2017
  • Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)
    Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)

Project Description

Antisocial behaviour is a very wide-ranging term including fighting, stealing temper tantrums and callousness among many other things. It may not make sense to consider these behaviours as a single construct but to identify meaningful subsets that may different causes, outcomes and respond well to different treatments. Many different classification schemes have been put forward in the past, based for example on the form of behaviour (e.g., involving physical aggression or not) or the age of onset. Projects can investigate the effectiveness of different classification schemes in a range of existing large-scale datasets, including those suitable for behavioural genetic analyses. This project would be particularly suited to someone wishing to develop skills in advanced quantitative methodologies.

Initial reading:

Moffitt, T. E., Arseneault, L., Jaffee, S. R., Kim-Cohen, J., Koenen, K. C., Odgers, C. L., . . . Viding, E. (2008). Research Review: DSM-V conduct disorder: research needs for an evidence base. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(1), 3-33. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2007.01823.

Rowe, R. (2014). Commentary: Integrating callous and unemotional traits into the definition of antisocial behaviour a commentary on Frick et al. (2014). Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 55(6), 549-552. doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12253

Funding Notes

This is one of many projects in competition for the current funding opportunities available within the Department of Psychology. Please see here for full details: View Website
Overseas students are welcome to apply for funding but must be able to demonstrate that they can fund the difference in the tuition fees.
Requirements: We ask for a minimum of a first class or high upper second-class undergraduate honours degree and a distinction or high merit at Masters level in psychology or a related discipline.

Related Subjects

How good is research at University of Sheffield in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience?

FTE Category A staff submitted: 34.45

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