• University of Manchester Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Macau Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Stirling Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Surrey Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Exeter Featured PhD Programmes
  • Northumbria University Featured PhD Programmes
  • University of Birmingham Featured PhD Programmes
University of Warwick Featured PhD Programmes
Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
FindA University Ltd Featured PhD Programmes
Coventry University Featured PhD Programmes
University of Glasgow Featured PhD Programmes

The role of sex hormones and brain activity in risk-taking and antisocial behaviour in adolescence


Project Description

While there are a number of reasons to hypothesise that circulating testosterone performs an important role in many risky behaviours, the findings of empirical studies remain unclear. It is likely that testosterone levels interact with other factors in the environment and may be the consequence of behaviour as well as a cause. In this project students might measure levels of circulating testosterone in saliva and examine their function in contexts such as antisocial behaviour (aggression, delinquency), risky driving behaviour, or in sports performance. This work will happen in parallel to investigating the neural mechanisms, using EEG, that may mediate circulating testosterone effects on cognition and behaviour.

Initial reading:

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., Worthman, C. M., Costello, E. J., & Angold, A. (2004). Testosterone, antisocial behavior, and social dominance in boys: Pubertal development and biosocial interaction. Biological Psychiatry, 55(5), 546-552. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2003.10.010

Duke, S. A., Balzer, B. W. R., & Steinbeck, K. S. (2014). Testosterone and Its Effects on Human Male Adolescent Mood and Behavior: A Systematic Review. Journal of Adolescent Health, 55(3), 315-322. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.05.007

Peper, J. S., Koolschijn, P. C., & Crone, E. A. (2013). Development of risk taking: contributions from adolescent testosterone and the orbito-frontal cortex. J Cogn Neurosci, 25(12), 2141-2150.

Funding Notes

Self funded or sponsored students only. No University funding available.


Related Subjects

How good is research at University of Sheffield in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience?

FTE Category A staff submitted: 34.45

Research output data provided by the Research Excellence Framework (REF)

Click here to see the results for all UK universities

Email Now

Insert previous message below for editing? 
You haven’t included a message. Providing a specific message means universities will take your enquiry more seriously and helps them provide the information you need.
Why not add a message here
* required field
Send a copy to me for my own records.

Your enquiry has been emailed successfully




Let us know you agree to cookies

We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By continuing, we'll assume that you're happy to receive all cookies on this website. To read our privacy policy click here

Ok