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The virtual body schema project: How can body schema be objectively defined and measured?

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  • Full or part time
    Dr SP Wilson
    Dr T Stafford
  • Application Deadline
    No more applications being accepted
  • Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)
    Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)

Project Description

The body schema can be loosely defined as the representation of the body in space, i.e., how you know you can reach the pint at the bar but not the bottle behind it; that you can fit through the door but not the cat-flap; that you must dive to kick a ball or duck to avoid a punch. Constructed from proprioceptive, somatosensory, visual, and auditory information, the body schema is like a bubble around the body, which includes bodily extensions such as clothes worn and tools wielded. When it goes awry, patients report a fascinating range of symptoms, for example amputees can experience pain originating in phantom hands. Given the importance of body schema to our everyday experience of the world, it is surprising just how little agreement there is between researchers (from philosophers, to neuroscientists, to roboticists) about the fundamentals: Namely, i) how can body schema be objectively defined, ii) how can body schema be objectively measured? The virtual body schema project aims to address these two challenges. Firstly, by constructing a psychological theory of body schema; through a series of experiments designed to explore the body schema as a representation in a space that is e.g., relative and/or absolute, topological and/or metric, innate and/or learnt? Secondly, by constructing a visualisation and virtual representation of a participant’s body schema, based on objective psychophysical measurements that may be rendered in realtime to a virtual avatar. An important aim will be to derive a set of principles for the design of body schema for better and safer artificial agents and robots. The project will involve developing novel virtual reality environments and motion capture technology.

Funding Notes

This is one of many projects in competition for the current funding opportunities available within the Department of Psychology. Please see here for full details: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/psychology/prospectivepg/funding
Overseas students are welcome to apply for funding but must be able to demonstrate that they can fund the difference in the tuition fees.
Requirements: We ask for a minimum of a first class or high upper second-class undergraduate honours degree and a distinction or high merit at Masters level in psychology or a related discipline.

How good is research at University of Sheffield in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience?

FTE Category A staff submitted: 34.45

Research output data provided by the Research Excellence Framework (REF)

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