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(1) Modelling BCG in the UK: what is the impact of changing vaccination policy or (2) modelling acquired drug resistance during TB treatment

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  • Full or part time
    Dr E Brooks Pollock
    Prof P Vickerman
  • Application Deadline
    Applications accepted all year round

About This PhD Project

Project Description

Rationale
In 2005 the BCG vaccination policy in Britain changed from universal vaccination of 10-14 year olds to targeted vaccination of newborn babies at high risk of infection. High risk is defined as children with a parent or grandparent from a high incidence country (>40 cases per 100,000 persons) or children living in a high incidence area in Britain.

Aims & Objectives
Aim: Estimate impact of changing vaccination policy and estimate efficacy of BCG in the UK population
Objectives:
- Review and analyse evidence on the use and effectiveness of BCG in the UK
- Develop and apply mathematical models to predict the epidemiological impact of the change in BCG vaccination policy in the UK

Methods
Use mathematical modelling to estimate impact of changing vaccination policy and estimate efficacy of BCG in the UK population. Potential approaches include developing a meta-population model based on census and travel data and fit to TB data in the UK. This PhD would suit someone with a quantitative background (a first degree in Maths, Stats, Physics or similar subject) or a life sciences graduate with an interest in epidemiology and mathematical modelling.

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