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Superconducting diamond devices for Quantum Bits (physics)

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  • Full or part time
    Dr Williams
    Dr Giblin
  • Application Deadline
    No more applications being accepted
  • Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)
    Competition Funded PhD Project (European/UK Students Only)

Project Description

Superconducting circuits have been shown to behave like “artificial atoms”, in that they exhibit quantised energy levels similar to that of the Bohr atom. Their ease of fabrication, scalability and the ability to control the energy spacing of the quantized levels have made them the most prevalent technology in Quantum Information Processing (QIP). Although the Quantum computer is considered to be long way off, this technology has been adopted by such mainstream companies as Google as the most promising approach.

Recently, doped diamond has been shown to be a superconductor. Cardiff Diamond Foundry has demonstrated working macroscopic quantum devices including Josephson Junctions and SQUIDs from superconducting diamond. This project aims to develop these devices into circuits, and ultimately QuBits for QIP. This fast moving research project will provide experimental experience in the manufacture and testing of quantum systems at temperatures less than 0.1 K. The physics and technology learned during this process will make a unique device.

Cardiff Diamond Foundry operates four state of the art diamond growth systems as well as comprehensive processing technology for the production of superconducting diamond films and nanodevices from them. 7mK capability dilution fridge (BlueFORS) and PPMS (Quantum Design) facilities are available within the group for low temperature characterisation.

This project is run in partnership with the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Diamond Science and Technology. The student will participate in a one year (fully funded) Masters course in Diamond Technology at Warwick University prior to starting the PhD at Cardiff University.

More details of the activity of Cardiff Diamond Foundry can be found at www.nanodiamond.co.uk. Informal enquiries should be directed to Prof O A Williams ([email protected]).

Funding Notes

This project is run in partnership with the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Diamond Science and Technology. The student will participate in a one year (fully funded) Masters course in Diamond Technology at Warwick University in 2016 prior to starting the PhD at Cardiff University in 2017.

How good is research at Cardiff University in Physics?

FTE Category A staff submitted: 19.50

Research output data provided by the Research Excellence Framework (REF)

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