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Impact of wellbore perforation in hydraulic fracturing and sand production in tight gas reservoirs

  • Full or part time
  • Application Deadline
    Applications accepted all year round
  • Self-Funded PhD Students Only
    Self-Funded PhD Students Only

Project Description

Wellbore perforation plays an important role in determining the success of well completion and hydraulic fracture generation in tight gas reservoirs. The geometry and density of perforation tunnel could substantially impact the growth of fracture panels and followed production profile. In this project the perforation strategy will be evaluated through an integrated modelling approach, which will incorporate coupled mechanisms involving wellbore medium instability, degradation and non-Darcy flow behavior around the wellbore, and fracture initiation-propagation from wellbore. We propose to exploit the models developed (TOUGH2-FLAC3D) to systematically analyze the impact of different perforation patterns, including the perforation density, orientation, and geometry in maintaining wellbore integrity, preventing the onset of sand production, and maximizing fracture network conductivity.
The PhD student will develop a particular discontinuum model to represent fluid infiltration and deformation around the wellbore and the full hydrofracture process. A constitutive model will be used to characterize and predict the concentration of sand production based on the plastic deformation near the wellbore regime. The damage in impairing fracture conductivity caused by sand production will be evaluated through a reservoir flow simulation. The student will obtain the high level expertise in drilling and hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir modelling skills will be either developed from this project.

Essential Background: Equivalent of 2.1 Honours Degree in Geophysics, Reservoir engineering, Geology

Knowledge of: theories about fluid flow and geomechanics (deformation and stress). It will be high desirable with background in programming in finite element and mathematics.

Funding Notes

The successful applicant will be expected to provide the funding for Tuition fees, living expenses and maintenance. Details of the cost of study can be found by visiting View Website. There is NO funding attached to this project. You can find details of living costs and the like by visiting View Website.

References

This project is advertised in relation to the research areas of the discipline of geology, petroleum engineering, and geophysics. Formal applications can be completed online: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply. You should apply for PhD in Geology, to ensure that your application is passed to the correct College for processing. Please ensure that you quote the project title and supervisor on the application form.

Informal inquiries can be made to Dr Quan Gan ([email protected]) with a copy of your curriculum vitae and cover letter. All general enquiries should be directed to the Graduate School Admissions Unit ([email protected]).

Related Subjects

How good is research at Aberdeen University in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences?

FTE Category A staff submitted: 28.40

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